Timezones and DST in Python

It’s incredible how fiddly it is to work with timezones.

Today, 14th of June—and this is important—I was trying to convert a made-up datetime from “Europe/London” to UTC.

I instinctively tried out this:
>>> almostMidnight = datetime.now().replace(hour=23, minute=59, second=59, microsecond=999999, tzinfo=pytz.timezone('Europe/London'))
>>> almostMidnight
datetime.datetime(2017, 6, 14, 23, 59, 59, 999999, tzinfo=<DstTzInfo 'Europe/London' GMT0:00:00 STD>)

At this point you will notice it didn’t take into account the DST offset (it should read BST).

As a further confirmation, converting to UTC keeps the same time:
>>> pytz.UTC.normalize(almostMidnight)
datetime.datetime(2017, 6, 14, 23, 59, 59, 999999, tzinfo=<UTC>)

Notice this result would be fine during the winter, so depending how much attention you devote and when you write the code you might miss out on this bug – which is why I love having the same suite of tests always running on a system that lives right after the upcoming DST change.

Even more subtler, if you were to try and convert to a different timezone, a geographical timezone that observes DST, you would see this:
>>> almostMidnight.astimezone(pytz.timezone('Europe/Rome'))
datetime.datetime(2017, 6, 15, 1, 59, 59, 999999, tzinfo=<DstTzInfo 'Europe/Rome' CEST+2:00:00 DST>)

Interesting. Now DST is accounted for. So converting to geographical timezones might also mask the problem.

Long story short, the correct way *I believe* to convert the timezone of a datetime object to UTC is to create a naive datetime object (no timezone info attached) representing localtime, and then call the “localize” of the timezone of interest. In code:
>>> almostMidnight = datetime.now().replace(hour=23, minute=59, second=59, microsecond=999999)
>>> almostMidnight
datetime.datetime(2017, 6, 14, 23, 59, 59, 999999)
>>> pytz.timezone('Europe/London').localize(almostMidnight).astimezone(pytz.UTC)
datetime.datetime(2017, 6, 14, 22, 59, 59, 999999, tzinfo=<UTC>)

There’s a very nice read on timezones by Armin Ronacher, which I recommend.

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